This:

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Photo courtesy of: www.egyptsearch.com

is a reconstruction of Tutankhamun, the boy king of Egypt, whose tomb was discovered by Howard Carter and whose name remains to be one of the most famous names of ancient Egyptian monarchy to this day. Not exactly the picture perfect image of health, let alone the image of Pharaoh.

This:

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Photo courtesy of: www.biography.com

is Avan Jogia,  a television actor who got his big break in the TV shows ‘Victorious’ and ‘Twisted’ before landing the titular role in Spike’s three part TV hit ‘TUT’. When you compare the two above pictures side by side, one thing may stand out:

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Image courtesy of: www.pinterest.com

‘TUT’ is a show that has earned high praise from critics and viewers alike. But there have also been complaints about the inaccuracy of the show, and Tut’s physical differences are just the beginning. And rightfully so; not only is there no proof of a woman named Suhad or a man named Lagus, but no one really knows what happened before Tut’s death. Therefore, the plotline of all three episodes is shaky at best.

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Photo courtesy of: www.moviestillsdb.com

But what else does TUT have to offer besides the inaccuracy? First off, the costumes are not only beautiful, but according to the Behind-The-Scenes clips, they were made traditionally, the way that we think ancient Egyptians made their clothes. In addition, the series was mostly filmed in Morocco, just a few countries away from modern day Egypt. So, the battle scenes filmed in the desert? Yeah, those were pretty real. How cool is that?

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Photo courtesy of: www.spike.com

But now let’s talk about the script again: despite the inaccuracies, what else does it offer to us? While the characters themselves are deeply written and the actors do a tremendous job of performing to the best of their abilities, the battle scenes do not disappoint in terms of action and suspense (see awesome picture above). There’s none of the usual predictability that you typically see in television shows, so you never know what’s going to happen except for the fact that Tut dies at the age of 19 (do I need a spoiler alert for a king that’s been dead for thousands of years?).

Now, knowing that, is TUT flawless? No, the show is probably about as inaccurate as calling Rafiki a monkey. However, after going over the rest of the show, just calling it out on its inaccuracy when it has so much more flavor to offer is really not giving the show the credit it deserves. With that in regard, I’d give TUT 8 out of 10 quills.

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So, what do you think? Would the boy king be proud of this fictitious legacy?